Classic Bildungsroman

Literary Excavations

Tag Archives: Bildungsroman

Topical Tuesday: Comfort Books

0

I am the sort of person who really loves what they love. I will eat the same meal until I’m sick of it. I’ve watched the same episodes of The Office and Doctor Who a shameful amount of times. And my favorite items of clothing literally get worn out. Books are no different. So today I want to talk about Comfort Books. These are the books that I reread consistently, either because I can’t get enough, or I’m going through tough times. These books can ground me and bring me back to who I am. They make me feel good. Sometimes these are guilty pleasure reads–meaning I know they aren’t objectively good enough to stand the test of time or join “The Canon”, but I just can’t stay away. Other times these are books which demand to be read over and over–books that offer something new every time. These are the books that I love unconditionally. So without further ado, here is a list of my Comfort Books:

Continue Reading →

Topical Tuesdays: 3D Printing Part III

0

3D Imaging Technology:

A look at current applications in the field of cultural heritage preservation

 

Introduction:

As 3D imaging becomes more ubiquitous, its applications in cultural heritage preservation continue to proliferate. While 3D imaging does not replace other preservation technologies and techniques completely, it provides new possibilities. Not only can 3D imaging aid in documentation, research and replication for professional use, but it also creates new educational opportunities for the patrons of cultural heritage institutions. According to Wahiowiak & Karas (2009), “In a North American context, 3D scanning of cultural material continues to be new and largely uncharted territory”; however, “the success of 3D scanning projects has resulted in the recent expansion of commercial 3D technology designed with an eye to heritage applications” (p. 143). This makes it an exciting and largely experimental time for cultural heritage institutions, who are now discovering the limits and capabilities of this technology.

Continue Reading →

Topical Tuesday: 3D Printing Part II

0

3D Imaging Technology:

A look at current applications in the field of cultural heritage preservation

 

Introduction:

As 3D imaging becomes more ubiquitous, its applications in cultural heritage preservation continue to proliferate. While 3D imaging does not replace other preservation technologies and techniques completely, it provides new possibilities. Not only can 3D imaging aid in documentation, research and replication for professional use, but it also creates new educational opportunities for the patrons of cultural heritage institutions. According to Wahiowiak & Karas (2009), “In a North American context, 3D scanning of cultural material continues to be new and largely uncharted territory”; however, “the success of 3D scanning projects has resulted in the recent expansion of commercial 3D technology designed with an eye to heritage applications” (p. 143). This makes it an exciting and largely experimental time for cultural heritage institutions, who are now discovering the limits and capabilities of this technology.

Continue Reading →

Topical Tuesday: Let’s Get Hi-Tech

0

3D Imaging Technology:

A look at current applications in the field of cultural heritage preservation

 

Introduction:

As 3D imaging becomes more ubiquitous, its applications in cultural heritage preservation continue to proliferate. While 3D imaging does not replace other preservation technologies and techniques completely, it provides new possibilities. Not only can 3D imaging aid in documentation, research and replication for professional use, but it also creates new educational opportunities for the patrons of cultural heritage institutions. According to Wahiowiak & Karas (2009), “In a North American context, 3D scanning of cultural material continues to be new and largely uncharted territory”; however, “the success of 3D scanning projects has resulted in the recent expansion of commercial 3D technology designed with an eye to heritage applications” (p. 143). This makes it an exciting and largely experimental time for cultural heritage institutions, who are now discovering the limits and capabilities of this technology.

Continue Reading →

Topical Tuesday: INLA Part IV

0

 

The Library During Times of Armed Conflict:

A look at Iraq’s National Library and Archives

  1. International law and cultural property:

4a. Brief background:

Historically, the destruction of libraries and archives during times of war has not been effectively prosecuted. Usually, such crimes fall within a general charge for destruction of property, or destruction of cultural property. Even more problematic, there are not very strong laws criminalizing the destruction of libraries and archives. UNESCO’s Memory of the World Program is one attempt to protect these places, but it does not criminalize their destruction. The 1954 Hague Convention for the Protection of Cultural Property in the Event of Armed Conflict is really the only weighty legal device which protects libraries and archives in times of war. Still, it is not well enforced. (Zgonjanin, 2005)

The 1992 destruction of the National and Academic Library of Bosnia and Herzegovina in Sarajevo, mentioned at the beginning of this paper, marks one of the only times in modern history that war criminals were specifically charged with the destruction of cultural property. The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has indicted several people for the cultural destruction that took place during the Balkan Wars of the 1990s. This was extremely important because it brought attention to the weakness of the 1954 Hague Convention. In 1999, the Hague Convention was expanded to include measures and funding for the protection of cultural property during armed conflict. The expansion also limited military activity to places of military necessity, and imposed individual criminal responsibility for those in any violation. (Zgonjanin, 2005)

Continue Reading →

Topical Tuesday: INLA Part III

0

 

The Library During Times of Armed Conflict:

A look at Iraq’s National Library and Archives

  1. Iraq’s National Library and Archives’ efforts to rebuild:

3a. Saad Eskander and INLA’s new culture:

When Saad Eskander assumed the role Director General of INLA following these events, he took drastic action. There was a major shortage of qualified, professional librarians and archivists in Iraq. He immediately hired dozens of young and recently graduated professionals (Kingsley, 2013). He made a point to hire both men and women, and to promote women to higher positions within INLA. He also fired those who had been convinced by the corruption of the library. (Eskander, 2011) Eskander sent many of his staff away for more training in places such as Italy, Czech Republic, Britain and the U.S. to reverse the lack of professional development. To circumvent the oppressive atmosphere that the Ba’athist regime had generated, Eskander also established democratic systems within the institution. Staff would be voted into positions as department heads and officials, instead of being appointed. (Kingsley, 2013) Slowly, these efforts helped Eskander transform a fearfully obedient staff into strong individuals unafraid to voice their opinions and seek improvements and modernization.

After re-training and improving the staff morale, the next problem to be tackled was the collection. Eskander threw out old collection policies in favor of more liberal, democratic ones. He sought to improve the existing collection by removing censorship policies and rejoining censored materials with the rest of the library. He also moved to purchase updated materials and began accepting book donations from foreign cultures and institutions. Critically important to these efforts, was the decision to declassify the records of the Ministry of Interior of the Ba’ath regime. In all endeavors, Eskander promoted full access to diverse information.

Continue Reading →

Fiction Friday: Let’s Talk Stories

0

Why You Should Read

The un-examined life is not worth living.” -Socrates

 

We all know the first stories were drawings on cave walls, followed by oral story telling, and the ancients chronicaling the lives and accomplishments of their gods and heroes. In these stories can be seen a desire to remember great events and understand the world around us. Stories of war and love and loss were passed down through generations–and can now be read in books and online by anyone with access. Myths and legends sprang up around the unexplainable and seemingly supernatural–and now we study them in classrooms all over the world. As people learned and nations grew, the stories evolved. We began to examine the world through all kinds of new genres of writing, and at multiple levels of society. We increasingly set aside unscientific explanations for the processes of nature and the universe, and turned to the novel for mythologizing. We now look to characters that we know to be fiction, but who teach us who we should and shouldn’t be all the same.

Continue Reading →